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Category: Labour Law

AVOID DISCRIMINATION WHEN POSTING JOB POSITIONS

AVOID DISCRIMINATION WHEN POSTING JOB POSITIONS

Recruiters should be careful when posting job positions so as not to land themselves in hot water with the Advertising Standards Authority of South Africa (ASA). In a recent incident, a respondent using the industry news website Bizcommunity, had to issue an apology for posting a job position with “Native English Speaker” as a requirement.

Excluding applicants on the basis of language, race or ethnicity

Mr Zibi lodged a consumer complaint against an advertisement which appeared on the website’s job listings. Among the advertised requirements was, “Native English speaking”.

Zibi claimed that the advertisement is discriminatory on the basis of language, which is a violation of the South African constitution and labour law.

The respondent in the matter claimed that the advertisement had already reached its expiry date and that the phrase is common. However, after having had internal talks around the issue, they decided to amend the advertisement to avoid any future types of these complaints. The amendment involved changing the position requirement to “Exceptional English writing and communication skills”, which they believed should address the issue.

Tread lightly

Although it was a small incident, it should not be treated casually, since some people may not be satisfied with an apology. The damage it could potential do to a company’s image should also not be underestimated. A simple error may lead to an extensive amount of time being taken to rectify the problem, which means a loss of money.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

References:

http://www.asasa.org.za/rulings/bizcommunity_khayagroup_mzibi_2017-4843f

 

THE 10 STEPS WHEN TAKING A DISPUTE TO THE CCMA

THE 10 STEPS WHEN TAKING A DISPUTE TO THE CCMA

If you have a dispute with your employer, you may want to ask the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (“CCMA”) to conciliate or even arbitrate your dispute. A union or employer’s organisation may also initiate this action. Furthermore, you do not need the other party’s consent before taking a matter to the CCMA.

Steps for disputes at the CCMA

According to the CCMA, the steps involved in resolving a dispute include:

Step 1: In the case of an unfair dismissal dispute, you have only 30 days from the date on which the dispute arose to open a case, if the case is an unfair labour practice, you have only 90 days and, with discrimination cases, you have six months.

Step 2: If you have decided to lodge a dispute, you need to complete a CCMA case referral form (also known as LRA Form 7.11.).

Step 3: Once you have completed the form, you need to ensure that a copy is delivered to the other party and you must be able to prove that a copy was sent.

Step 4: You do not have to bring the referral form to the CCMA in person. You may also fax the form or post it. Make sure that a copy of the proof that the form had been served on the other party is also enclosed.

Step 5: The CCMA will inform both parties as to the date, time and venue of the first hearing.

Step 6: Usually the first meeting is called conciliation. Only the parties, trade union or employers’ organisation representatives (if a party to the dispute is a member) and the CCMA commissioner will attend.

Step 7: If no agreement is reached, the commissioner will issue a certificate to that effect. Depending on the nature of the dispute, the case may be referred to the CCMA for arbitration or the Labour Court as the next step.

Step 8: In order to have an arbitration hearing, you have to complete a request for arbitration form, (also known as LRA Form 7.13.). A copy must be served on the other party (same as in step 3).

Step 9: Arbitration is a more formal process and evidence, including witnesses and documents, may be necessary to prove your case. Parties may cross-examine each other and legal representation is allowed. The commissioner will make a final and binding decision, called an arbitration award, within 14 days.

Step 10: If a party does not comply with the arbitration award, it may be made an order of the Labour Court.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Reference:

The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration | CCMA|

http://www.ccma.org.za/Advice/Referring-a-Dispute

ALL WORK AND NO PAY

ALL WORK AND NO PAY

What are your rights as an employee if your employer has not paid you?

 Under some circumstances, your salary notification might pop in 2 days after the expected pay date due to banking with a different institution. But what happens when a few more days pass and no salary has reflected, even after you have checked with your bank? You may be tempted to wait it out and hope for the best, but as an employee, you are protected by the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA) No. 75 of 1997, provided you work for more than 24 hours a month.

Applicable law

As stated by the law, the payment periods acceptable for employers to pay their employees are daily, weekly, fortnightly or monthly. Section 32 (3)(a) of the BCEA states, “An employer must pay remuneration not later than 7 days after the completion of the period for which the remuneration is payable.” Should the employer fail to comply with this, the employee may then request, by letter of demand, an explanation from the employer. This letter may also be kept as proof for the employee should the matter require legal intervention.

Where to go

If the employee earns less that the threshold of R149 736.00 per year, they may approach the Department of Labour to lay a complaint of their non-payment. After filing the complaint, the Department of Labour will send an inspector to the employer to investigate the matter further, and an instruction of payment with an expected payment date will then be issued. Upon failing to comply with this instruction after various steps of intervention have been taken, then it will lead to some of the employer’s assets being sold to raise the outstanding monies.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Reference

Basic Conditions of Employment Act. (2017). [ebook] Republic of South Africa, pp.15-16. Available at:

http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/downloads/legislation/acts/basic-conditions-of-employment/Act%20-%20Basic%20Conditions%20of%20Employment.pdf [Accessed 30 Oct. 2017].

Retrenchmentassist.co.za. (2017). Employer’s Failure To Pay Your Salary. [online] Available at:

http://www.retrenchmentassist.co.za/index.php/ra-newsletters/100-employers-failure-to-pay-your-salary [Accessed 30 Oct. 2017].

Should I have to tolerate Corporate Bullying?

Should I have to tolerate Corporate Bullying?

Every employee has the right to be treated with dignity and respect in the workplace, and employees do not have to tolerate bullying by employers. Bullying in the workplace is a serious matter that should not be taken lightly; trying to ignore it may only make it worse. Fortunately, there are steps that can be taken to address the problem of a workplace bully, whether they are a colleague or your employer.

Defining Bullying

Workplace bullying links to feelings of incompetence as well as job insecurity. It is generally seen as unwelcome conduct which is hostile or offensive and induces a fear of harm and/or humiliation.

  1. Bullying usually seems to arise when an employer wishes to get rid of a particular employee, but does not want to follow proper procedure; the aggressive and harassing behaviour is resorted to in the hope that the employee will resign.
  2. Bullying is classed as an unfair discrimination and a violation of human rights. It results in poor morale among employees and insufficient concentration at work, which can lead to a loss of productivity.

Bullying vs the Law

According to the Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act 4 of 2000, workplace bullying is offensive conduct in the workplace which is persistent and/or serious and demeans, humiliates or creates a hostile or intimidating environment. This offensive conduct includes workplace violence, moral harassment and emotional abuse.

The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) states that employers have a duty to protect workers from bullying, and that they should develop a code of conduct on harassment in consultation with the employees and the employee representatives.

Dealing with Bullying

It is the responsibility of the employer to develop a policy or code of conduct with regards to bullying, and they should educate managers and employees on suitable workplace behaviour. Grievance procedures must be established to protect employees from bullying; senior management should actively support the introduction of these procedures, and they should implement practices to alleviate workplace bullying.

It is important that human resource practitioners are educated in effective investigation processes with regards to bullying in the workplace. Suitable reporting mechanisms should be established between human resource departments and senior management to report on corporate bullying.

  • When an employee gets bullied, it is advised that he/she first confronts the bully directly, in the presence of a witness, and request the bully to cease the harassment immediately.
  • They also have the option of turning to their union or employees’ association for assistance.
  • Once the case has been reported, the employer is obliged to investigate the case and if necessary, disciplinary action must be taken against the bully.
  • Any matters that cannot be resolved at employer level can be referred to the CCMA for conciliation and if a resolution is not reached by that process, then the matter will be referred to the Labour Court.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE).

References:

http://www.lexisnexis.co.za/pdf/1-1-Corporate-Bullying-Rycroft.pdf; Workplace Bullying: Unfair Discrimination, Dignity Violation Or Unfair Labour Practice? Faculty of Law, University of Cape Town, 2009. Web. 22 June 2017.

http://www.labourguide.co.za/general/374-harassment-in-the-workplace; “Harassment In The Workplace”. Labourguide.co.za. N.p., 2017. Web. 22 June 2017.

CAN I MAKE A CASE OF UNFAIR LABOUR PRACTICE IF I HAVE SETTLED?

CAN I MAKE A CASE OF UNFAIR LABOUR PRACTICE IF I HAVE SETTLED?

A1_BIn this article we will discuss whether, in the face of an agreement between an employer and an employee in terms of which an employee accepts a demotion to a lower position, the employee is nevertheless entitled to refer an unfair labour practice dispute concerning this demotion to the CCMA.

The facts in Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd v Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and Others[1] can be summarised as follows: The employee worked as an Administrative Manager at Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd. She was informed by doctors that she was very ill and would most likely have to go to hospital frequently and take various types of medication. Over the next three years her absenteeism increased significantly and her employers became concerned as she was no longer able to do her job effectively, even when she was not absent, due to the side effects of her medication. Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd, after having discussions with the employee, suspended her pending an investigation into her capacity to undertake the functions of an Administrative Manager, taking into account her health and performance. Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd held an incapacity hearing and the external Chairperson ruled that, due to the employee’s excessive and increasing absenteeism, dismissal was the appropriate sanction. The Chairperson, however, offered her a demotion instead of a dismissal. The employee accepted this demotion in writing.

After this agreement between Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd and the employee was concluded, she obtained legal assistance and subsequently complained to the CCMA that Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd had committed an unfair labour practice by demoting her.

The question here is whether, in the face of an agreement between Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd in terms of which the employee accepted demotion to a lower position, she was nevertheless entitled to refer an unfair labour practice dispute concerning this demotion to the CCMA.[2]

The arbitrator in the CCMA decided that because there was consent to the demotion, the CCMA did not have jurisdiction to hear the dispute. The employee then appealed to the Labour Court and once again to the Labour Appeal Court, of which the outcomes are set out below.

The Labour Court and the Labour Appeal Court looked at Section 186(2)(a) of the Labour Relations Act[3] in this regard, which states the following:

“Unfair labour practice means any unfair act or omission that arises between an employer and an employee involving –

unfair conduct by the employer relating to the promotion, demotion, probation (excluding disputes about dismissals for a reason relating to probation) or training of an employee or relating to the provision of benefits.”

The Labour Appeal Court upheld the judgement in the Labour Court and found that although a binding contract comes into existence when employers and employees settle their differences by agreement, such an agreement does not mean that the CCMA does not have jurisdiction to hear the dispute. The fact that the parties have agreed that the employee accepts demotion is not a complete defence for the employer because the ambit of this unfair labour practice is wide enough to include the implementation of an agreement to accept demotion.[4] The Labour Appeal Court confirmed that the determination of whether a demotion took place, unlike the determination of dismissal, does not require an arbitrator to determine if there was consent or not.[5]

In conclusion, it is clear from the Builders Warehouse case that, although consent is a relevant issue in regard to the merits of a dispute regarding an unfair labour practice, it is not a jurisdictional prerequisite. This means that the CCMA does have the power to hear a matter relating to a demotion even though there was consent thereto.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. (E & OE) 

Bibliography

l Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd v Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and Others (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC

l Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995

[1] (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC.

[2] (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC Par 12.

[3] Act 66 of 1995.

 

[4] Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd v Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and Others (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC Par 14.

[5] Builders Warehouse (Pty) Ltd v Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and Others (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC Par 13.

KAN EK STEEDS ‘n SAAK VAN ONBILLIKE ARBEIDSPRAKTYK MAAK AS EK GESKIK HET?

KAN EK STEEDS ‘n SAAK VAN ONBILLIKE ARBEIDSPRAKTYK MAAK AS EK GESKIK HET?

A1_BIn hierdie artikel is die besprekingspunt of daar in die aangesig van ‘n ooreenkoms tussen ‘n werkgewer en ‘n werknemer in terme waarvan ‘n werknemer ‘n demosie na ‘n laer posisie aanvaar, die werknemer nogtans geregtig is om ‘n onbillike arbeidspraktyk-geskil oor hierdie demosie na die KMVA te verwys.

Die feite in Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. v Kommissie vir Versoening, Bemiddeling en Arbitrasie en Andere[1] is as volg: Die werknemer was ‘n Administratiewe Bestuurder by Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. Sy het van haar dokters verneem dat sy baie siek is en waarskynlik gereeld in die hospitaal opgeneem sal moet word en verskeie soorte medikasie sal moet neem. Oor die volgende drie jaar het haar afwesigheid aansienlik toegeneem, gevolglik het haar werkgewers bekommerd geraak toe sy nie meer in staat was om haar werk effektief te doen nie, selfs wanneer sy nie afwesig was nie, as gevolg van die newe-effekte van die medikasie. Na gesprekke met die werknemer het Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. haar tydelik afgedank hangende ‘n ondersoek oor haar vermoë om die funksies van ‘n Administratiewe Bestuurder uit te voer, met inagneming van haar gesondheid en vermoëns. Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. het ‘n onvermoë-verhoor gehou en die eksterne Voorsitter het beslis dat, as gevolg van die werknemer se oormatige en toenemende afwesigheid, ontslag die gepaste sanksie was. Die Voorsitter het haar egter ‘n demosie in plaas van ontslag aangebied. Die werknemer het hierdie demosie skriftelik aanvaar.

Nadat hierdie ooreenkoms tussen Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. en die werknemer gesluit is, het sy regshulp verkry en daarna ‘n klag by die KVBA ingedien dat Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. ‘n onbillike arbeidspraktyk gepleeg het toe hulle haar demoveer het.

Die vraag hier is of, in die aangesig van ‘n ooreenkoms tussen Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. in terme waarvan die werknemer demovering na ‘n laer posisie aanvaar het, sy tog geregtig was om ‘n onbillike arbeidspraktykgeskil oor hierdie demovering na die KVBA te verwys.[2]

Die arbiter in die KVBA het besluit dat, omdat daar toestemming tot die demosie was, die KVBA nie jurisdiksie het om die geskil aan te hoor nie. Die werknemer het hierna na die Arbeidshof appélleer en weer na die Arbeidsappèlhof, waarvan die uitkomste hieronder uiteengesit word.

Die Arbeidshof en die Arbeidsappèlhof het in hierdie verband na artikel 186(2)(a) van die Wet op Arbeidsverhoudinge[3] gekyk, wat die volgende bepaal:

“Onbillike arbeidspraktyk beteken enige onbillike handeling of versuim tussen ‘n werkgewer en ‘n werknemer wat –

‘n onregverdige optrede deur die werkgewer met betrekking tot die bevordering, demosie, proeftydperk (uitgesonderd geskille oor ontslag om ‘n rede rakende proef) of opleiding van ‘n werknemer of rakende die voorsiening van voordele.”

Die Arbeidsappèlhof het die uitspraak van die Arbeidshof gehandhaaf en bevind dat, hoewel ‘n bindende kontrak tot stand kom wanneer werkgewers en werknemers hul verskille per ooreenkoms oplos, so 'n ooreenkoms nie beteken dat die KVBA nie jurisdiksie het om die geskil aan te hoor nie. Die feit dat die partye ooreengekom het dat die gegriefde werknemer ‘n demosie aanvaar, is nie ‘n volledige verdediging vir die werkgewer nie, omdat die bestek van hierdie onbillike arbeidspraktyk wyd genoeg is om die implementering van ‘n ooreenkoms om demovering te aanvaar, in te sluit.[4] Die Arbeidsappèlhof het bevestig dat die bepaling van die vraag of ‘n demosie plaasgevind het, in teenstelling met die bepaling van ontslag, nie ‘n arbiter vereis om te bepaal of daar toestemming was of nie.[5]

Ten slotte is dit duidelik uit die geval van Builders Warehouse dat, alhoewel toestemming ‘n relevante kwessie oor die meriete van ‘n geskil oor ‘n onbillike arbeidspraktyk is, dit nie ‘n jurisdiksie voorvereiste is nie. Dit beteken dat die KVBA die mag het om ‘n saak rakende ‘n demosie aan te hoor, selfs al is toestemming daartoe verleen.

Hierdie is ‘n algemene inligtingstuk en moet gevolglik nie as regs- of ander professionele advies benut word nie. Geen aanspreeklikheid kan aanvaar word vir enige foute of weglatings of enige skade of verlies wat volg uit die gebruik van enige inligting hierin vervat nie. Kontak altyd u regsadviseur vir spesifieke en toegepaste advies.

Verwysingslys

l Builders Warehouse (Edms.) Bpk. v Kommissie vir Versoening, Bemiddeling en Arbitrasie en Andere (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC

l Wet op Arbeidsverhoudinge 66 van 1995

[1] (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC.

[2] (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC Par 12.

[3] Act 66 of 1995.

[4] Builders Warehouse (Edms) Bpk v Kommissie vir Versoening, Bemiddeling en Arbitrasie en Andere (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC Par 14.

[5] Builders Warehouse (Edms) Bpk v Kommissie vir Versoening, Bemiddeling en Arbitrasie en Andere (PA 1/14) [2015] ZALAC Par 13.

DO YOU KNOW YOUR DOMESTIC WORKER’S RIGHTS?

DO YOU KNOW YOUR DOMESTIC WORKER’S RIGHTS?

MHI_A3blThe Department of Labour, in terms of The Basic Conditions of Employment Act 75 of 1997, provides an outline of domestic workers’ rights. Here are some important factors to keep in mind when employing a domestic worker in your home

HOURS OF WORK

  • A domestic worker may work a maximum of 45 hours per week, which can be 9 hours per day for a 5-day work week or 8 hours per day for a work week of more than 5 days;
  • Overtime must be agreed to and cannot be more than 15 hours per week, or 12 hours work on any given day;
  • Overtime must be compensated at one and a half times the normal wage.

Night work

Night work is work between 18:00 and 06:00. This can only be required if:

  • Agreed to in writing;
  • The domestic worker is compensated with an agreed allowance;
  • The domestic worker resides on the premises or transport is readily available.

Work on Sundays

Work on a Sunday must be compensated at double the normal daily/hourly wage, unless a Sunday includes the domestic worker’s agreed ordinary hours of work, which is compensated at one and a half times the normal wage.

WAGES

Domestic workers are entitled to at least the prescribed minimum wage. If you find that you are paying way more than the prescribed minimum, do not unilaterally lower your domestic worker’s wage, as this would be an automatically unfair business practice. Below is an outline of the current minimum wage payable for the period 1 December 2014 to 30 November 2015:

AREA MORE THAN 27 HOURS PER WEEK LESS THAN 27 HOURS PER WEEK
AREA A R 10.59 per hour
AREA B R 9.30 per hour
AREA A R 12.40 per hour
AREA B R 10.98 per hour

Some unfamiliar provisions

  • A domestic worker who works less than four hours a day must be paid for the hours worked on that day;
  • A domestic worker is entitled to a payslip on every payday, which can be daily, weekly or monthly;
  • You cannot deduct payment from a domestic worker’s wage in respect of the supply of work clothing or food supplied;
  • A deduction of not more than 10% is allowed for accommodation supplied to the domestic worker;
  • An employer is obliged to supply the domestic worker with particulars of employment, in other words an employment contract.

TYPES OF LEAVE

Annual Leave

An employer must grant a domestic worker 3 weeks annual leave for every 12 months of employment, which amounts to 1 day for every 17 days worked. An employer may not pay the domestic worker instead of granting leave, except on termination of employment. Leave pay must be paid before the beginning of the leave period.

Sick Leave

  • Over a 36 month cycle, a domestic worker is entitled to sick leave equal to the number of work days in a 6 week period;
  • An employer may require a medical certificate before paying a domestic worker if he/she is absent for more than 2 consecutive days or absent on more than 2 occasions in an 8 week period;
  • An employer must first provide reasonable assistance to a domestic worker residing on the premises, for whom it is not reasonably possible to do so, to obtain a medical certificate before electing to withhold payment for sick days taken.

Maternity Leave

A domestic worker is entitled to 4 consecutive month’s maternity leave. As with any other form of employment, the dismissal of a domestic worker on account of pregnancy, or any reason related to pregnancy, is automatically unfair. Payment for this period is at the employer’s discresion.

TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

The employment contract may be terminated by either party on notice as follows:

  • One weeks’ notice if the domestic worker has been employed for 6 months or less;
  • 4 weeks’ notice if the domestic worker has been employed for more than 6 months;
  • If the employer retrenches the domestic worker, he/she is entitled to severance pay equal to one weeks’ full pay for each year of continuous service.

Ceritificate of service

Upon termination of employment, a domestic worker is entitled to a certificate of service setting out, amongst other things:

  • Job title;
  • Period of employment;
  • Relevant training received;
  • Reason for the termination, but only on request of the domestic worker.

– By Michelle Taljaard, Candidate Attorney, MHI Attorneys

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice.

WEET U WAT U HUISWERKER SE REGTE IS?

WEET U WAT U HUISWERKER SE REGTE IS?

MHI_A3blDie Departement van Arbeid, in terme van die Wet op Basiese Diensvoorwaardes No.75 van 1997 verskaf ‘n uitleg van huiswerkers se regte. Hier is ‘n paar belangrike faktore om in gedagte te hou wanneer u ‘n huiswerker in u woning aanstel :

WERKSURE

  • ‘n Huiswerker mag ‘n maksimum van 45 ure per week werk, wat 9 ure per dag vir ‘n 5 dag werksweek kan wees, of 8 ure per dag vir ‘n werksweek van meer as 5 dae;
  • Oortyd moet op ooreengekom word en mag nie meer as 15 ure per week, of altesaam 12 werksure per dag wees nie;
  • Oortyd moet vergoed word teen een en ‘n half keer die normale loon.

NAG WERK

Nag werk is werk tussen 18:00 en 06:00 en kan slegs vereis word indien:

  • Dit skriftelik met die huiswerker ooreengekom is;
  • Die huiswerker daarvoor vergoed word teen ‘n toelaag waarop ooreengekom is;
  • Die huiswerker op die perseel woon, of daar vervoer maklik beskikbaar is.

SONDAG WERK

Werk op ‘n Sondag moet vergoed word teen dubbel die normale loon, behalwe as Sondae deel vorm van die huiswerker se normale ooreengekome werksdae. In daardie geval moet die huiswerker teen een en ‘n half keer die normale loon vergoed word.

LONE

Huiswerkers is geregtig op ten minste die voorgeskrewe minimum loon. As u vind dat u meer betaal as die voorgeskrewe minimum, mag u nie eensydig u huiswerker se lone verlaag nie, aangesien dit ‘n automatiese onbillike besigheidspraktyk sal wees. Hier volg ‘n uitleg van die huidige minimum loon betaalbaar vir die periode 1 Desember 2014 tot 30 November 2015:

AREA MEER AS 27 UUR PER WEEK MINDER AS 27 UUR PER WEEK
AREA A (metropool areas) R 10.59 per uur
AREA B (landelike areas) R 9.30 per uur
AREA A (metropool areas) R 12.40 per uur
AREA B (landelike areas) R 10.98 per uur

N PAAR ONBEKENDE BEPALINGS

  • ‘n Huiswerker wat minder as 4 ure per dag werk moet op die dag betaal word;
  • ‘n Huiswerker is geregtig op ‘n betaalstrokie op elke betaaldag, wat daagliks, weekliks of maandeliks kan wees;
  • Bedrae ten opsigte van werksklere of kos verskaf mag nie van ‘n huiswerker se lone afgetrek word nie;
  • ‘n Aftrekking van nie meer as 10% van die huiswerker se loon word toegelaat wanneer akkommodasie verskaf word nie;
  • ‘n Werkgewer is verplig om ‘n huiswerker met besonderhede van indiensneming te verskaf, met ander woorde ‘n dienskontrak.

TIPES VERLOF

JAARLIKSE VERLOF

Huiswerkers is geregtig op 3 weke betaalde verlof vir elke 12 maande se diens, wat neerkom op 1 dag vir elke 17 dae gewerk. ‘n Werkgewer mag nie die huiswerker uitbetaal in die plek van verlof toeken nie, behalwe by die beëindiging van die dienskontrak.

SIEKVERLOF

  • In ‘n siklus van 36 maande, is ‘n huiswerker geregtig op siekverlof gelykstaande aan die aantal werksdae in ‘n 6 week periode;
  • ‘n Werkgewer mag aandring op ‘n mediese sertifikaat voor die huiswerker vergoed word, indien hy/sy afwesig is vir meer as 2 agtereenvolgende dae of op meer as 2 geleenthede in ‘n 8 week periode;
  • Werkgewers moet eers redelike hulp verleen aan huiswerkers wat op die perseel woon, vir wie dit nie redelik moontlik is om ‘n mediese sertifikaat te bekom nie, alvorens hulle besluit om betaling vir die siek dae geneem, te weerhou.

KRAAMVERLOF

‘n Huiswerker is geregtig op 4 agtereenvolgende maande se kraamverlof. ‘n Ontslag vir enige rede gekoppel aan ‘n huiswerker se swangerskap is automaties onregmatig. Betaling vir hierdie tydperk berus by die werkgewer.

BEëINDIGING VAN DIE DIENSKONTRAK

Die dienskontrak mag deur enige van die partye beëindig word deur kennis as volg aan die ander party te gee:

  • 1 week kennis as die huiswerker minder as 6 maande werksaam was;
  • 4 weke kennis as die huiswerker meer as 6 maande werksaam was;
  • In gevalle waar die werkgewer die huiswerker “retrench”, is hy/sy geregtig op ‘n skeidingspakket gelykstaande aan 1 week se lone vir elke jaar se ononderbroke diens.

SERTIFIKAAT VAN DIENS

Wanneer die dienskontrak beëindig word is die huiswerker geregtig op ‘n sertifikaat van diens wat onder andere uiteensit:

  • Titel;
  • Tydperk van indiensneming;
  • Relevante opleiding ontvang;
  • Rede vir beëindiging van die dienskontrak, slegs op versoek van die huiswerker.

Geskryf deur Michelle Taljaard, Kandidaatprokureur, MHI Prokureurs

Hierdie is ‘n algemene inligtingstuk en moet gevolglik nie as regs- of ander professionele advies benut word nie. Geen aanspreeklikheid kan aanvaar word vir enige foute of weglatings of enige skade of verlies wat volg uit die gebruik van enige inligting hierin vervat nie. Kontak altyd u regsadviseur vir spesifieke en toegepaste advies.

A TEACHER`S RIGHT TO STRIKE

A TEACHER`S RIGHT TO STRIKE

article1bl-NovemberThe Labour Relations Act, 66 of 1995 (LRA) has been in the spotlight recently following communications from government that it is considering designating the education sector as an essential service. This has created a source of tension between government and the education sector unions regarding teachers’ right to strike.

The right to strike is a right afforded to all employees in terms of section 23(2)(c) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996. However, the LRA does contemplate restrictions on the right to strike in respect of those employees who are engaged in essential services.

A service or industry or any part thereof may be designated as an essential service by the Essential Services Committee (ESC), established in terms of section 70 of the LRA. The ESC is tasked with designating a service, or any part of a service as an essential service, after conducting an investigation into whether or not such a designation should be made. It is critical to note that any parties who may be affected by the designation of a service as an essential service by the ESC, has the right in terms of section 71 of the LRA (which sets out the procedure in terms of which the ESC will designate a service as an essential service), to make representations to the ESC in regard to whether or not a service should be so designated.

Unions have argued that the designation of a sector or service as an essential service is unconstitutional in that such a designation takes away the rights of employees working in a particular industry to strike. However, while this is correct in that section 74(1) of the LRA provides that employees working in a designated essential service may not strike, these provisions are not one-sided, and the LRA provides for additional mechanisms, which ameliorate what seems to be a blanket restriction against striking.

Firstly, the employer in the essential service is similarly restricted from utilising its own bargaining power to lock employees out of the workplace to compel them to accept the employer’s terms and conditions. The LRA goes on to provide for a mechanism in terms of which essential service workers can legally and lawfully embark on strike action, provided that certain agreements are first put in place.

Section 72 of the LRA provides for parties in designated essential services to enter into a collective agreement, which can regulate the minimum services to be provided by workers in that essential service in the event of a strike. If such a minimum service collective agreement is reached, it will have the effect that:

  • the minimum service levels agreed to will become the essential service; and
  • section 74 of the LRA – which prevents essential services workers from striking – will no longer apply.

This will mean that the only employees who will be prevented from striking are that number of employees, or percentage of the workforce that is required to continue providing the minimum services. All other employees who are not required to provide the minimum service, even though they are employed in a sector or industry designated as an essential service, will be allowed to strike.

The minimum service agreement must contain the following detail:

  • whether the service is essential in its entirety or only partially essential;
  • whether the service is essential at reduced service levels;
  • the minimum number of employees required to continue working during a strike, expressed either as a number or as a percentage of the current workforce;
  • the type of services that must be continued during strike action;
  • minimum service levels associated with various functions and duties to be performed during strike action; and
  • waiver of a right to engage replacement labour to provide services in excess of the minimum services.

CONCLUSION

In light of the above it is clear that, even though the LRA provides for a mechanism in terms of which sectors can be classified as an essential service, to the extent that this does not take place the mechanism of concluding minimum service agreements through the collective bargaining process may be an alternative means of ensuring continued minimum service levels.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice.

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‘N ONDERWYSER SE REG OM TE STAAK

‘N ONDERWYSER SE REG OM TE STAAK

article1bl-NovemberDie Wet op Arbeidsverhoudinge, 66 van 1995, (WAV ) was onlangs  in die kollig na kommunikasies van die regering dat hy oorweeg om die onderwyssektor as ‘n noodsaaklike diens te verklaar. Dit het ‘n bron van spanning veroorsaak tussen die regering en die onderwyssektor se vakbonde met betrekking tot onderwysers se reg om te staak.

Die reg om te staak is ‘n grondwetlike reg wat verleen word aan alle werknemers kragtens artikel 23 (2)(c) van die Grondwet van die Republiek van Suid-Afrika, 108 van 1996. Die WAV plaas egter sekere beperkings op die reg om te staak ten opsigte van werknemers wat noodsaaklike dienste lewer.

‘n Diens of bedryf, of enige deel daarvan, kan as ‘n noodsaaklike diens verklaar word deur die Komitee vir Noodsaaklike Dienste wat kragtens artikel 70 van die WAV ingestel is. Die Komitee se taak is om ‘n diens, of enige deel van ‘n diens, as ‘n noodsaaklike diens te verklaar nadat daar behoorlik ondersoek is of so ‘n verklaring gemaak moet word al dan nie. Dit is van kritieke belang om daarop te let dat enige partye wat geraak word deur die verklaring van ‘n diens as ‘n noodsaaklike diens deur die Komitee, die reg het om kragtens  artikel 71 van die WAV (waarin die prosedure waarvolgens die Komitee `n diens sal verklaar as ‘n noodsaaklike diens, uiteengesit word) vertoë te rig tot die Komitee met betrekking tot of ‘n diens verklaar moet word as `n noodsaaklike diens al dan nie.

Vakbonde het aangevoer dat die verklaring van ‘n sektor of diens as ‘n noodsaaklike diens ongrondwetlik is in die mate dat so ‘n verklaring die regte van werknemers in ‘n bepaalde nywerheid om te staak, wegneem. Terwyl dit egter korrek is dat artikel 74(1) van die WAV bepaal dat werknemers in ‘n verklaarde noodsaaklike diens nie mag staak nie, is hierdie bepalings nie eensydig nie en maak die WAV wél voorsiening vir bykomende meganismes wat die oënskynlik omvattende beperking op staking, teenwerk.

Eerstens word die werkgewer in die noodsaaklikedienssektor ook  beperk in die gebruik van sy eie bedingingsmag om werknemers uit die werkplek te sluit en hul sodoende  te dwing om die werkgewer se terme en voorwaardes te aanvaar. Die WAV gaan voort en maak voorsiening vir ‘n meganisme waarvolgens noodsaaklikedienswerkers wettig en regtens mag staak mits daar eers sekere ooreenkomste in gereedheid gebring is.

Artikel 72 van die WAV maak voorsiening vir partye in verklaarde noodsaaklike dienste om ‘n kollektiewe ooreenkoms te sluit, wat die minimumdienste wat deur werkers verskaf moet word in die geval van ‘n staking in daardie noodsaaklike diens, kan reguleer. Indien so ‘n minimumdiens kollektiewe ooreenkoms bereik is, sal dit die effek hê dat:

  • die minimumdiensvlakke waarop ooreengekom is, die noodsaaklike diens word; en
  • artikel 74 van die WAV wat verhoed dat noodsaaklikedienswerkers mag staak, nie meer van toepassing sal wees nie.

Dit sal beteken dat die enigste werknemers wat verhoed sal word om te staak daardie getal werknemers of persentasie van die arbeidsmag is wat benodig word om die noodsaaklike minimumdienste te lewer. Alle ander werknemers wat nie die minimumdienste hoef te lewer nie, selfs al is hulle in diens van ‘n sektor of bedryf wat as ‘n noodsaaklike diens verklaar is, sal toegelaat word om te staak.

Die minimumdiensooreenkoms moet die volgende besonderhede bevat:

  • of die diens in sy geheel of net ten dele noodsaaklik is;
  • of die diens steeds noodsaaklik is teen verlaagde diensvlakke;
  • die minimum getal werknemers wat nodig is om voort te gaan met die werk tydens ‘n staking, hetsy uitgedruk as ‘n syfer of as ‘n persentasie van die huidige arbeidsmag;
  • die aard van die dienste wat gedurende ‘n staking voortgesit moet  word;
  • minimumdiensvlakke wat verband hou met onderskeie funksies en pligte wat tydens ‘n staking uitgevoer moet word; en
  • kwytskelding van die reg om tydelike vervangende arbeid aan te stel om dienste te lewer wat meer is as die minimumdienste.

GEVOLGTREKKING

In die lig van die voorgaande is dit duidelik dat, hoewel die WAV voorsiening maak vir ‘n meganisme waarvolgens sektore as ‘n noodsaaklike diens verklaar kan word,  daar in die mate dat dit nie gedoen word nie, meganismes daargestel is vir die sluiting van minimumdiensooreenkomste deur die proses van kollektiewe bedinging as ‘n alternatiewe manier om volgehoue ​​minimumdiensvlakke te verseker.

Hierdie is ‘n algemene inligtingstuk en moet gevolglik nie as regs- of ander professionele advies benut word nie. Geen aanspreeklikheid kan aanvaar word vir enige foute of weglatings of enige skade of verlies wat volg uit die gebruik van enige inligting hierin vervat nie. Kontak altyd u regsadviseur vir spesifieke en toegepaste advies.

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