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MY NEIGHBOURS ARE RENOVATING THEIR HOUSE WITHOUT COMPLYING WITH BUILDING REGULATIONS. WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS?

MY NEIGHBOURS ARE RENOVATING THEIR HOUSE WITHOUT COMPLYING WITH BUILDING REGULATIONS. WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS?

What one’s neighbour builds on their property, is not something the owner of the neighbouring property has a lot of control over. Unfortunately, it can have a negative impact on your property if the building work completed on your neighbour’s property does not comply with building regulations. Furthermore, it can be aesthetically displeasing, and be a sore eye to your property. Is there anything you can do in terms of the law to assist you in situations like these?

Buildings not complying with building regulations:

In the context of increasing state regulation, the adjudication of neighbour disputes about building has now apparently mostly migrated from the private law context of reasonableness to the public law context of legality. One consequence of this shift is that any building, first of all, has to comply with statutory and regulatory requirements before there could be any question about the reasonableness of any impact it may have on neighbours. Building works that do not comply with the applicable formal requirements (including permission to develop or subdivide, removal or amendment of restrictive conditions, compliance with zoning restrictions, and approval of building plans) are illegal regardless of their effect on neighbours.

To have these building works declared illegal (to have building work stopped or to have the completed building work demolished), neighbours do not have to prove that the buildings are unnatural, abnormal or unreasonable in the context – the mere fact that they do not comply with the formal requirements is enough to render them illegal. Building and zoning regulations are normally enforced by the relevant local authorities, but if they fail to do so, it has been decided that neighbours have the necessary locus standi to apply for a court order to enforce compliance with the relevant laws and regulations.

Remedies

The local authority or neighbours can obtain an interdict to stop the building work and – at least in some instances – an order to have the illegal buildings demolished.

It has been decided that the courts have the discretion to award monetary compensation rather than order demolition, but recently the courts have repeatedly stated that they will not be precluded from handing down demolition orders simply because buildings have been completed or because of the cost or value of completed building works or the hardship that the builder would suffer if a demolition order was granted.[1]

Views, sunlight, natural flow of air, privacy

A landowner cannot complain generally speaking, when otherwise lawful building works on adjoining or neighbouring land obstruct her previously existing view across that land or her previously existing access to sunlight, natural light or the natural flow of air.[2]

In De Kock v Saldanhabaai Munisipaliteit[3], the applicant argued that the building plans approved with regard to neighbouring land had to be reviewed and set aside because the building, once completed, would allow the neighbours to see onto his property, thereby invading his privacy. The application was dismissed because the court found no indication that the local authority had failed to apply its mind or to consider the relevant legislation and regulations in approving the plans. The implication seems to be that a landowner does not have an independent, inherent right to oppose building works on neighbouring land that would afford a view onto his property.[4]

Conclusion:

If a building does not comply with the relevant building regulations, or is not built according to an approved plan, an aggrieved neighbour’s primary remedy is to report the building to the municipality. The municipality is then supposed to interdict the person transgressing building regulations from building further and can even order for the demolition of an illegal structure. If the municipality fails in abovementioned duty, a neighbour can approach the court to enforce compliance with municipal regulations.

Building work which is only aesthetically displeasing or cause a loss of privacy, but adheres to all municipal regulations, will not constitute an actionable cause of action. The rationale behind this is because of the subjective nature of aesthetic considerations – what bothers one neighbour will not bother the next. Therefore, a neighbour’s remedies in this regard are very limited.

[1] AJ van der Walt, The Law of Neighbours, 1st edition, (2010), p. 341-343

[2] Van der Walt, The Law of Neighbours, p. 356

[3] 7488/04 (2006) ZAWCHC 56 (28 November 2006)

4] Van der Walt, The Law of Neighbours, p. 372
 
This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

INVESTING IN A RENTAL PROPERTY

INVESTING IN A RENTAL PROPERTY

Buying a rental property could be an incredible investment opportunity, however, it’s important to make a well-informed decision before investing, as it is not for everyone. Although investing in a rental property provides many benefits, such as a potential extra income, and a way of paying off the property, it poses certain risks as well.

The following should be considered when deciding whether or not to invest in a rental property:

  1. Calculate the upfront costs:

When you purchase a property, there are several upfront costs that would need to be paid. These include bond costs, attorney fees, bank initiation fees and transfer duty. You need to be fully financially prepared before investing in a rental property. In the case of applying for a bond, your financial circumstances will be taken into account, as a means of determining whether or not you will be able to service a loan.

  1. Calculate the ongoing costs:

After the property has been purchased, there are several ongoing costs that need to be considered. These costs include rates and taxes, insurance and maintenance.

  1. Vacant rental properties:

If your rental property is empty for a period of time, you need to ensure that you have the funds to cover the costs of your rental property. You cannot depend on your rental property generating an income 24/7.

  1. Rent:

The amount of rent you can charge your tenant per month will depend on factors such as property type, amenities, etc. This should play a vital role in your decision when buying a rental property.

  1. Rental agreement:

Before a tenant moves in, you need to ensure that you have a very strong rental agreement in place. This agreement will protect the property owner in the case of disputes and damages to the property.

  1. Taxes:

The rent that you receive from the tenant, is not meant to go straight to your pocket. Tax law states that the property owner needs to pay tax on the rent received from the tenant.

  1. Potential tenants:

When looking at potential tenants, it is of vital importance that the owner vet all potential tenants, in the form of credit checks, background checks, etc.

The above-mentioned points should be considered before investing in a rental property. As mentioned, it could be a sound investment and provide you with a potential extra income once the property has been paid off, however, if not done right, it could cost the property owner dearly, so be sure to make a well-informed decision before investing.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

THE CYBERCRIMES BILL: MALICIOUS MESSAGING OVER SOCIAL MEDIA COULD SEND YOU TO JAIL

THE CYBERCRIMES BILL: MALICIOUS MESSAGING OVER SOCIAL MEDIA COULD SEND YOU TO JAIL

South Africans will soon have to be much more careful and think twice about the messages they send over WhatsApp and other social media platforms, as the Cybercrimes Bill (“the Bill”), which was recently adopted into law and is in the process of being enacted, attempts to police malicious messaging.

Cybercrime is on the rise and the Bill essentially aims to stop these acts, to keep people safe from criminals and terrorists, to improve the security of the country and to bring South Africa in line with other countries’ cyber laws. The practical impact of the Bill on all organisations and individuals are significant and unfortunately mostly negative. It impacts all of us who process data or use a computer.

Contravening the provisions entailed in the Bill could lead to a fine or imprisonment for a period not exceeding three years, or to both a fine and imprisonment. The Bill fundamentally intends to curb the number of harmful messages, which by definition now covers a wide range of subject areas, that do the rounds on social media.

The Bill incriminates, amongst others, the following acts in particular:

  • Disrupting another’s personal details: By sharing another’s personal details online for malicious purposes, without their knowledge and/or consent.
  • Unlawful sharing of intimate images: Publishing and/or distributing another’s nude intimate images or multimedia files of an intimate nature will constitute a harmful disclosure of pornography, which the Bill seeks to regulate. The Bill describes an “intimate image” as both real and simulated messages which shows the person as nude or displays his/her genital organs or anal region. This includes instances where the person is identifiable through descriptions in a message or from other information displayed in the data message. These acts can cause extensive reputational damage to another, especially if the said person had no intention of making it public.
  • Sharing of information regarding investigations into cybercrimes: The Bill enables the Minister of Justice to make regulations on information sharing. This includes sharing information on cybersecurity incidents, detecting, preventing and investigating cybercrimes.
  • Inticing damage to property belonging to “a group of persons”: Sharing messages which encourage people to damage property belonging to a certain demographic group, could lead to an arrest simply for the incitement rather than the act. This act includes any implied threats of violence against “a group of persons”.

The Bill was first published on 28 August 2015, updated on 19 January 2017 and introduced in Parliament on 22 February 2017, where it currently still sits. There have been extensive comments on the Bill during the public participation period in 2017. These comments have been considered and incorporated and the latest version of the Bill was published on 23 October 2018. The new version of the Bill creates many new offences, some relating to data, messages, computers and networks.

The Bill has come a long way since its first publication and the overall effect of its provisions will be tested over time. Readers are, however, advised to take note of the Bill and its consequences before it is signed into law, as ignorance of the law will not be an excuse.

Reference List:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

BEFORE SIGNING A LEASE

BEFORE SIGNING A LEASE

Tenants often take the signing of a lease agreement lightly and don’t read carefully through the terms and conditions. A proper lease agreement will ensure that both parties’ rights are protected. Landlords must ensure that they include all the necessary information in a lease agreement, while tenants must make sure that all the points discussed with the landlord are included in the lease, instead of just assuming that they are.

Enquire about costs and duration

The monthly rental cost and duration of the lease (including specific dates) must clearly be stated in the lease agreement to avoid any confusion regarding this matter. The lease agreement should also clearly indicate how and when any increases in rent will take place. If the landlord doesn’t provide you with this information, ask him/her to give it to you in writing so you can keep it on record.

The lease should also clearly explain any deposits (e.g. the rental deposit) that have to be paid, as well as the terms and conditions regarding the refund of deposits. All other variable usage expenses (like water or electricity) that the tenant will have to pay should also be clearly stated.

Some rental properties include utilities within the monthly rental cost, while others don’t. Some properties might offer on-site gym memberships, for example, which could save you money. Before you sign the lease to a property, ask your landlord what is included in the rental rate.

Get information regarding changes to the property

Once the landlord has agreed to rent out his property to you, make sure that you document any pre-existing damages to the property and its amenities before you sign the lease. Ask whether these damages can be fixed at the landlord’s expense.

Both the landlord and the tenant are responsible for the maintenance of the property. The responsibilities of both parties should be clearly stated in the lease agreement. The lease agreement should also indicate how the tenant must report any problems that require repair.

Make sure which amendments can be made to the property. Rather know the rules and stick to them, instead of making an alteration and then finding out afterwards that your landlord is unhappy with it. Just imagine your landlord’s disgust after finding out that you’ve repainted his freshly white-painted walls red!

Conclusion

Tenants should be sure to understand the contents contained in the lease agreement and that they understand all the clauses, terms and conditions to avoid any surprises later. While renting a property isn’t as much of a financial commitment as buying a home is, tenants should remember that a lease is nevertheless a legally binding document, meaning that they should make sure that they agree with everything contained therein before they sign it.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

JOINT OWNERSHIP: HOW DO I TERMINATE WITHOUT THE CO-OPERATION OF THE OTHER JOINT OWNER?

JOINT OWNERSHIP: HOW DO I TERMINATE WITHOUT THE CO-OPERATION OF THE OTHER JOINT OWNER?

Nature of joint ownership:

Joint owners own undivided shares in the property which they own jointly. Consequently, the joint owners cannot divide the joint property while the joint ownership remains in existence, and a joint owner also cannot alienate the property or a part thereof without the consent of the other joint owner. The rights in respect of the joint property need to be exercised jointly by the owners thereof.

Ways in which joint ownership can arise:

Joint ownership can come into existence by way of an inheritance in which an indivisible property is left to more than one person in indivisible shares; by way of a marriage in community of property, by the mixture of movable property in such a way that it forms a new movable item or by way of an agreement in terms of which the parties agree to jointly buy a property and that both will have equal indivisible shares in the property.

Division of joint property:

Any joint owner can claim the division of the joint property according to that joint owner’s share in the property.[1] It is a requirement for the division of the joint property that the parties need to try to divide the property among themselves first, before approaching the Court for an action to divide the property, which action is called the actio communi dividendo[2].

The underlying principle of the actio communi dividendo is that no co-owner is normally obliged to remain such against his will. If there is a refusal on the part of one of the co-owners to divide, then the other co-owner can go to Court and ask the Court to order the other to partition. The Court has a wide discretion in making a division of the joint property, which is similar to the discretion which a court has in respect of the mode of distribution of partnership assets among partners. 

The Court may award the joint property to one of the owners provided that he/she compensate the other co-owner, or cause the joint property to be put up to auction and the proceeds divided among the co-owners.[3]  Where there is no agreement between the parties as to how the joint assets are to be divided a liquidator is ordinarily appointed, and he can then sell the assets and divide the proceeds, if it is not possible to divide the assets between the parties.[4] If the immediate division of the joint property will be detrimental to the parties, the Court can order in certain cases that the division or the sale of the property be postponed for a period.[5]

It is beneficial that there exist means to divide assets which are jointly owned by parties, who no longer wish to be co-owners, but who cannot reach an agreement on the division of the assets. Without such an action, people might be stuck with a property which they derive no benefit from because it is in the possession of the other co-owner, who refuse to sell the property.

[1] Inleiding tot die sakereg, Van Niekerk & Pienaar, Juta, p 53 – 61.

[2] Robson v Theron 1978 (1) SA 841 (A).

[3] 1978 (1) SA 841 (A).

[4] 1978 (1) SA 841 (A).

[5] Van Niekerk & Pienaar, p 61 – 62.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

There is a way to keep the view

There is a way to keep the view

When you purchase a house with a view, you probably think that you are going to enjoy this view every day for the rest of your life. Until you receive a flyer with a picturesque multi-story building guaranteed to block your view. This will definitely result in a few disputes that will leave you wishing you had secured your view.

Right to the view

Just because the property has an unrestricted view, it does not mean that the view is the owner’s. To secure it, a registration of a servitude against the title deeds of the properties in the Deeds Office. This includes the natural growth of trees or plants that will block the view over time.

The registered servitude

The registration of the servitude must be made clear where the intentions of the servitude are established and made clear. This is so that when an issue regarding property views reaches the court, the court would need not be concerned about ambiguity and surrounding circumstances.

Court’s considerations

Before reaching a decision, the court may be mindful of considerations when the servitude is interpreted. The result will try, as far as possible, to alleviate burdens on the servient property owner. Emphasis is placed on views and the purpose of the servitude as to provide unobstructed views as they existed at the time of the creation of the servitude.

A new property owner may have to consider the type of building they are wishing to erect so it does not impose on any restrictions in terms of an agreement made by the “owner” of the view.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

WHEN CAN THE MUNICIPALITY DISCONNECT MY WATER AND ELECTRICITY?

WHEN CAN THE MUNICIPALITY DISCONNECT MY WATER AND ELECTRICITY?

The municipality is the place where most, if not all, services are monitored for their availability to a property, and it is the very place that may cut off the supply of said services. Their authority does, however, come with the responsibility of remaining within the legal boundaries of managing the supply of services to properties. This article will explore the legalities of disconnecting water or electricity.

Accounts in arrears

If one of your municipal services is in arrears, the municipality is well within their rights to disconnect whatever service when there are undisputed arrears owed to any other service in connection with the related property. Before any disconnection takes place, there is a procedure for the municipality to follow.

Notices

The municipality is legally obligated to give a notice to the person responsible for the account. A minimum of 14 days written notice of termination is required for water and electricity accounts in arrears and if the notice period is shorter than 14 days, or not supplied, the disconnection is illegal. The 14-day notice gives the responsible party an opportunity to present any disputes or queries they may have regarding the account or allow them to repay the arrears.

The query period

Once a query relating to the account has been put in, the municipality may not disconnect services provided that the amount being queried is equal to the amount in arrears. In the case where the amount is less that the amount in arrears, the service may be disconnected for the undisputed amount owing.

Payment of arrears

When a query has been logged, it can only be valid for so long provided that the monthly bill or any other related payments are being made to the respective account. If the responsible person does not make any form of payment, the service may be disconnected even if a logged query exists with the municipality.

State where the payment should go

If there is an account dispute and the responsible person makes a payment to the municipality, the municipality may choose to allocate that money to any account they wish to do so. This means the account in need of the payment may not have the payment made into it. To curb this, the responsible person must notify the municipality, in writing, of the payments being made as well as which account they should be allocated to. This must be done before payment is made.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

CAN MY PROPERTY BE USED FOR AIRBNB?

CAN MY PROPERTY BE USED FOR AIRBNB?

When deciding whether to become an Airbnb host, it’s important for you to understand how the laws work in your city.

According to Brett Herron, the mayoral committee member for transport and urban development at the City of Cape Town, different holiday accommodation land use types, such as B&Bs and guest houses, are regulated by the City’s zoning scheme, called the Development Management Scheme.

If referring to Cape Town, for instance, the city has a Guest Accommodation Policy that sets out the guidelines that have to be considered when applications are made to obtain the necessary planning permissions. According to the Policy, if you wanted to provide a self-catering, flexible accommodation option in line with current trends for transient guests, visitors and tourists, then these are the guidelines that should be followed:

Purpose

  • A building or group of buildings consisting of separate accommodation units rented for residential purposes, each incorporating a kitchenette / full kitchen, but may also include an option of meals being provided communally to guests.
  • May include communal areas for the exclusive use by lodgers / transient guests.

Scale

  • Form and scale of development determined by development parameters of particular zone (i.e. floor space, building lines, height) and the site context.
  • No general restriction on number of units, but must be locally appropriate in context of the building/site characteristics and surrounding area.
  • Council may determine / restrict the number of units per development in cases and lay down conditions necessary to mitigate the impact thereof.

Location

  • Not supported on a single residential zoned property, subject site must have suitable general residential, mixed use or commercial zoning.
  • Locational criteria that should be considered, include:
  • proximity to public transport routes, commercial centres and tourist activities.
  • character of the surrounding area;
  • mixed use or commercial locations (including areas designated for high density development) are encouraged.

Conclusion

In many cities, you must register, get a permit, or obtain a licence before you can list your property or accept guests. Certain types of short-term bookings may be prohibited altogether. Local municipalities may also vary greatly in how they enforce these laws. However, it is not impossible to list your property on Airbnb, you just have to find out from the local municipality if you have the correct permissions and if the property has the correct zoning.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Reference

Guest Accommodation Policy, the City of Cape Town, Department of Planning & Building Development Management.

“Regulating Airbnb in Cape Town”, Jan Vermeulen, MyBroadband. https://mybroadband.co.za/news/government/210884-regulating-airbnb-in-cape-town.html

UNDERSTANDING SALES

UNDERSTANDING SALES

You decide to buy a fridge and a washing machine on Gumtree. It is important to note that there are several elements involved in this seemingly simple sale: (1) the sale agreement; (2) the transfer of ownership; (3) the risk of damage to the items; and (4) defects in the item.

(1) Sale Agreement

The law distinguishes between the contract of sale and the actual transfer of ownership. These two are treated as separate events in the overall transaction. The sale agreement is the underlying contract in terms of which the seller undertakes to transfer the property to the buyer in exchange for consideration. All the remedies under the law of contract are available here and it is in terms of the sale agreement where the buyer is afforded the most legal protection e.g. if the seller guarantees the washing machine will work for 3 years and it does not, then you can claim from the seller for breach of contract; or if the seller misrepresents that the washing machine is a front-loader when in fact it is a top-loader, the contract can be cancelled on the basis of misrepresentation and the goods and monies paid are to be returned. However, the agreement of sale does not on its own transfer property from the seller to the buyer.

(2) Transfer of Ownership

To pass ownership there must be delivery of the item and the intention to actually transfer ownership. In the case of a cash sale, the price must also be paid at the same time as delivery in order for ownership to transfer. In a credit sale, ownership passes on delivery and payment of the purchase price is postponed. In our law, ownership can be transferred if these requirements are met without a valid contract of sale. However, the buyer would have a claim against the seller in unjustified enrichment.

(3) Risk

A further element to consider is who bears the risk of damage or destruction to the property before it is delivered. Risk passes from the seller to the buyer when the sale agreement is ‘perfected’. This is when the price has been set; and the item be determined or identified. Any suspensive conditions must also be fulfilled. A suspensive condition suspends the operation of the contract until the happening of a future event e.g. I will sell the washing machine to you if my cousin does not buy it by Wednesday. The operation of this contract is suspended until Wednesday. Where damage takes place prior to the fulfilment of the suspensive condition, the seller bears the risk.

(4) Defects

Where there is a latent defect (one not visible upon reasonable inspection) then the buyer can ask for a reduction in the purchase price. Only where the item is so defective that it is not fit for its purpose and that a reasonable person would not have bought the item, can it be returned. This is the extent of a buyer’s remedies for latent defects. It is only where the seller is a professional seller (e.g. retail store trading in appliances) or a manufacturer, that the buyer claim for all losses e.g. the loss suffered where a faulty washing machine damaged clothing and the surrounding walls and cupboards.

However, where an item is sold ‘voetstoots’, it is sold in its condition ‘as is’. This voetstoots clause forms part of the sale agreement. Where such a clause is present, there is a duty on the buyer to properly inspect the property and ensure that there are no defects. If the buyer notices a defect later on, he will have no remedies available against the seller.

Conclusion

In most cases where you have entered into a sale and are dissatisfied with the outcome, the most extensive relief would be contractual remedies for breach of the sale agreement. However, it is important to establish whether risk has in fact transferred to you before you took delivery of the item. Furthermore, buyers should be cautious as to whether items are being sold ‘as is’, because such a clause leaves the buyer without any remedies where the item is defective. However, this voetstoots clause would not protect a seller who is acting fraudulently. Should you wish to know more, feel free to make an appointment with our offices.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

RENTING PROPERTY TO FOREIGNERS

RENTING PROPERTY TO FOREIGNERS

Renting property in South Africa is a straightforward process. The country has a vast selection of rental accommodation including bachelor flats in apartment blocks, Victorian cottages, stand-alone houses with big gardens, and semi-detached units in modern townhouse complexes.

In South Africa, the right of a foreigner to purchase immovable property was restricted in the past by the Aliens Control Act. These restrictions were uplifted in 2003 by the new Immigration Act (“the Act”) which repealed the Aliens Control Act and many of its restrictive provisions and now clearly defines who a legal foreigner is and who is not. In short, a legal foreigner is a person in possession of a valid temporary residence permit or a permanent residence permit approved by the Department of Home Affairs.

The new Act makes provision for various temporary residence permits to be issued to foreigners, including amongst others:

  • A visitor’s permit
  • A work and entrepreneurial permit
  • A retired person permit

In principle, a landlord or tenant can legitimately lease or sell immovable property to any person recognised under the Act as a legal foreigner.

That said, foreigners working in South Africa with a legal work permit, are not regarded as “non-residents” by the South African Reserve Bank. They are considered to be residents for the duration of the period of their work permit and are therefore not restricted to a loan of only 50% of the purchase price.

It is also important to take note that the Act criminalizes the letting or selling of immovable property to an illegal foreigner by making this transaction equivalent to the aiding and abetting of an illegal foreigner and is such an act classified as a criminal offence in terms of the Act.

In conclusion, a legal foreigner may let or buy immovable property in South Africa, provided that he is the holder of either a legal temporary residence permit or a permanent residence permit approved by the Department of Home Affairs. Ensure that you enquire from your potential tenant or purchaser whether they are legally present in South Africa and obtain the necessary proof from them before entering into any transaction with a foreigner. Also, take account of the restrictions on local financing, particularly where the procurement of financing is a condition precedent to the agreement.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

References:

http://www.expatarrivals.com/south-africa/accommodation-in-south-africa

http://www.avidfirefly.co.za/00000/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=92:can-i-lease-or-sell-my-house-to-a-foreigner?